Monday, January 14, 2013

Laziness and Priorities


Okay, there are two ways to look at it: either I am incredibly lazy—a lifelong condition—or I simply have a different set of priorities than most. I think I prefer the latter alternative. I have never sufficiently applied myself to anything. My school report cards were often accompanied by notes to my parents to the effect that “Roger could do much better if he'd only apply himself.” In college, I found it much more important to take full advantage of just enjoying the experience than in devoting as much time as I really should have to my studies. I averaged mostly B’s, but probably could have upped several of those to A’s if I had, as they say, applied the seat of my pants to the seat of a chair more diligently.

When I became a Naval Aviation Cadet, this tendency nearly got me killed—literally—on more than one occasion. I never did learn the numbers of the runways, relying on just following the guys ahead of me. Where they landed, I landed. On one night-flying exercise, several planes were sent up at the same time to practice formation flying. We were instructed to climb at a certain set speed, and to descend at another set but different speed in order to keep an exact distance between planes. I promptly forgot which speed was which and descended far more rapidly than I should have—a fact I did not realize until I saw the wingtip lights of the plane descending directly ahead of me getting larger and larger, faster and faster. I pushed the control stick sharply forward, and looked up to see the plane which was supposed to be ahead of me directly over my head. I pulled back the throttle to slow down, and managed to get back into my proper position, but it scared the hell out of me, and rightly so.

I waste an inordinate amount of time going back to check things which I should easily have remembered. I’m copying a list of numbers, say, from one window on my computer to another. 5, 15, 31, 12, say. I look at them carefully and say them over as I look at them: 5, 15, 31, 12. I close out that window and go to the new window where I want to type in the numbers. 5, 15, 44, uh.....Back to the first window. 5, 15, 31, 12…5, 15, 31, 12…5. 15, 31, 12. Back to the window I want to put them. It’s been all of, what, three seconds? 5, 15,....uh.....

The principle of “Speak/act first, think later” seems, unfortunately, to have become my mantra. I don’t know how many times I have had to go back to apologize for, clarify, or correct something I got wrong the first (and often the second or third) time. I know, I know…if I took the time to get it right the first time, I wouldn’t have to go back and re-do it time after time. Sort of like being a “born again” Christian…once should have been enough.

I like to think…I hope…it is simply a matter of priorities. I suspect my mind is always asking itself: “How really important is this in the scheme of things?” and the answer is more often than not “Not very.” Memorizing numbers certainly isn’t that high on my list of important things. Nor is making my bed, or dusting, or putting things away if there is a chance that I might be using them again in the next week or so. There are far more important things to do, like writing books and blogs and gathering acorns for the coming winter.

I tell you this because I am quite sure I am the only human being in the history of the world to have experienced this annoying-to-infuriating condition, and there is a strong streak of perversity and need for self-flagellation in my character, and I have always hastened to point out my flaws and imperfections before anyone else has a chance to do it for me.

Be grateful you have none.

Dorien's blogs are posted by 10 a.m. Central time every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Please take a moment to visit his website (http://www.doriengrey.com) and, if you enjoy these blogs, you might want to check out Short Circuits: a Life in Blogs (http://bit.ly/m8CSO1).








4 comments:

Donna Brown said...

You are not the only one! I could have written a similar post! I spent my high school years scribbling stories in note books. I enjoyed lecture classes and was annoyed when assemblies took away from my writing time. Now my husband cannot understand how housework often takes a backseat to writing. I definitely have a different set of priorities!

Dorien/Roger said...

Nice to know I'm not alone, Donna!

Kage Alan said...

If I wasn't interested in a subject in school, I simply tuned out. It was like an automatic reaction. I think I've gotten a tiny bit better at it over the years. As for anything else, I thank a higher power for post-it notes. It's often the only way I remember anything coming up.

Donna Brown said...

Kage Alan, Is 3M your higher power?